D-Sector for Development Community

   Saturday, September 22, 2018
Agriculture - Duties and Rights - Education - Environment - Food - Global - Governance - Health - Indian Economy - Indian Society - Physical Development - Social Welfare - Water and Sanitation
 
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Sharp Quotes
By D-Sector Editorial Team

Interesting, profound or out of the box comments on various issues.
 
"We must look to the consequences of our own demand and consumption: the energy we use, the kind of cars we drive, the products we buy, the food we eat, and our individual impact on the natural world."
- Dennis Kucinich, US Congressman (D-OH)
 
 

"Owing to the gap between creation and dissemination of knowledge, agriculture output has not converted into income for farmers. The distance is worrying since this sector remains critical to the well-being of India."
- Dr Abhijit Sen, Member, Planning Commission of India
 
 

"Repression and injustice are flourishing in the global justice gap, condemning millions of people to abuse, oppression and poverty."
- Claudio Cordone, interim Secretary General of Amnesty International
 
 

"In too many places, children are seen as commodities, in too many instances they are treated as criminals instead of being protected as victims, and there are too many conflicts where children are used as soldiers, spies or human shields."
- Ban Ki-moon, Secretary General, United Nations
 
 

"I cannot be oblivious to the larger development agenda of the government. I cannot perennially be putting spokes in every wheel."
- Jairam Ramesh, Indian Minister for Environment and Forests, indicating pressure on him to put economic growth before environment protection
 
 

"Biodiversity loss is moving ecological systems ever closer to a tipping point beyond which they will no longer be able to fulfill their vital functions"
- Ban Ki-moon, United Nations' Secretary-General
 
 

"Many economies remain blind to the huge value of the diversity of animals, plants and other life forms and their role in healthy and functioning ecosystems from forests and freshwaters to soils, oceans and even the atmosphere"
- Achim Steiner, UN Environment Programme Executive Director
 
 

"Let us be very clear. Mining activity cannot come to a halt. But illegal mining must stop."
- Jairam Ramesh, Minister of Environment and Forests, Govt of India
 
 

"I had to live everyday with the consequences of the loss of capacity to produce a rice crop in Haiti to feed those people because of what I did; nobody else. … It may have been good for some of my farmers in Arkansas, but it has not worked. It was a mistake."
- Bill Clinton, former USA President, apologizing for flooding Haiti with cheap American rice in the mid 1990s which destroyed farm livelihoods in Haiti
 
 

"New Mining policy will be oriented towards development, towards common people on whose land they make their property. Mind that, it's on their land. Ultimately, they are not getting anything. No one is going to accept that."
- Bijoy Krishna Handique, Minister of mines, Govt of India
 
 

"For Bolivians and for indigenous peoples, the idea is to live well. And this term ‘living well’ is important, as opposed to ‘living better’ — living well. Capitalism, to live better, pillages resources in an unbridled manner, exploits the children of Mother Earth, which are the human beings, destroys nature, squandering. It causes so much damage to humanity. Hence the debate is on the structural causes of global warming."
- Evo Morales, Bolivia's President on climate change
 
 

"The people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki -- and especially the hibakusha -- know too well the horror of nuclear war. It must never be repeated."
- Ban Ki-Moon, UN Secretary-General on nuclear disarmament
 
 

"It is irksome that the best articles on Himalayan glaciology are from Ohio State University."
- Jairam Ramesh, India's Minister for Environment and Forests
 
 

 
Corruption Watch

The bad news is that corruption has not only sustained but has grown in size and stature in the country. With scams being a regular feature, seventy per cent respondents in a survey have rightfully opined that corruption has continued to increase in India. One in every two interviewed admit having paid a bribe for availing public services during last one year. Transparency International's latest survey reveals that the political parties top the chart for the most corrupt public institutions, followed by police force and legislatures. No wonder, India continues to make new records on the global corruption arena!

The shocking revelation is that the health and education sectors haven't remained untouched by this phenomenon. With 5th and 6th positions respectively for these sectors on the public perception chart on corruption, corruption has crept insidiously into these sectors of hope for the masses. With bureaucracy being fourth in the list of corrupt institutions in the country, corruption seems to have been non-formally institutionalized with little hope if public services would ever be effective in the country. With economic growth having literally institutionalized corruption, are we now expecting corrupt to be socially responsible - a different CSR.

Poor. Who?

Not giving 'aid' to India is one thing but calling it 'rich' is quite another. If one in three of the world's malnourished children live in India, what does average daily income of $3 indicate? It perhaps means that there is a relative decline in poverty - people are 'less poor' than what they used to be in the past. But having crossed the World Bank arbitrary threshold of $2 a day does not absolve the 'developed' countries of their obligation to part with 0.7 per cent of their Gross National Income in development aid. Should this three-decade old figure not be revised?  

An interesting debate in UK's House of Commons delved on future of development assistance by the British Government. While prioritizing limited resources has been a concern, there has been no denying the fact that development aid must be guided towards tangible gains over a short period of time to start with. There are difficult choices for elected governments to make - should they invest in long-term primary education or in short-term university scholarships? Which of these will bring gains and trigger long-term transformation in the society. As politicians continue to be divided on the matter, poverty persists!!   

Lead View
People, Partition and the Pain
By Rina Mukherji
15 Aug 2013

Dr Jayanti Basu's book analyzes the complex feelings of hatred and longing for the homeland that have contributed to shaping the personalities of a generation of people who were forced to ..
Book Shelf

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Commentators
Devinder Sharma
Carmen Miranda
Pandurang Hegde
Sudhirendar Sharma
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